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nanoCOLT - Long-term effect of modified carbon black nanoparticles on healthy and damaged lungs

Publications

Publications

 

 

 

The most commonly produced nanoparticles worldwide are the carbon-based nanoparticles usually in the form of industrial carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP) and they are used for various applications. The lung is considered the most critical organ regarding the intake of airborne nanoparticles via inhalation. Neither the toxic effects of repeated or long-term exposures to such nanoparticles nor the toxic potentials of different surfaces of carbon black nanoparticles (e.g. loading with PAH, 9-nitroanthracene, benzo[a]pyrene, and allergens) have been studied yet. The joint research project NanoCOLT with its 5 project partners is going to answer these questions in the next 3 years. By means of increasingly complex experimental models, NanoCOLT intends to test the toxic long-term effects of modified and well-characterised carbon black nanoparticles in the respiratory tract and in the lungs. Testing systems are comprised of simple cell culture and tissue culture models through to inhalation studies in animal models.

 

Images of the lung taken with (A) a Scanning Electron Microscope or (B) light microscope showing the airways (AW) and surrounding alveoli (AL). Arrows indicate inhaled agglomerates of carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP).Images of the lung taken with (A) a Scanning Electron Microscope or (B) light microscope showing the airways (AW) and surrounding alveoli (AL). Arrows indicate inhaled agglomerates of carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP).

Several approaches are being pursued. On the one hand, the effects of repeated oropharyngeal application in contrast to permanent inhalative exposure are investigated.

 

On the other hand, the effect of carbon black nanoparticles applied to already damaged lungs is analysed. The latter approach is pursued because damaged lungs are assumed to be more sensitive to harmful substances (noxae) and because, compared to healthy lungs, the toxicological effects of nanoparticles may occur after shorter-term exposure. Since chronic lung diseases are on the increase, it must be assumed that quite a large part of the exposed persons are already suffering from lung diseases and that these persons are more susceptible to exposure with nanoparticles. The respective studies focus on two different models of previously damaged lungs that reflect two different modes of damage including exposure to a 10 ppm NO2 atmosphere and a model of allergic respiratory inflammation.

The systematic analysis of the toxic long-term effects of different surface modifications of the carbon black nanoparticles on normal and previously damaged lungs is important to industrial production, handling, and use of synthetic carbon black nanoparticles. A careful selection of toxically harmless variants could reduce a potential health risk without limiting the range of technical applications.

The high technical and economic potential of nanomaterials can be assumed to lead to a considerable increase in the production and use of carbon-based and other nanoparticles. The capability of assessing the related health risks for healthy persons and persons with lung diseases by means of the developed testing methods thus is of great social relevance.

 

 


BMBF Grant No.: 03X0153

Duration01.10.2014 - 30.09.2017 (extended to 31.12.2017)


 

Project Lead

Universität Marburg Logo

Prof. Dr. Bernd Müller, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg (DE)

 

 

Project Partners

 

Forschungszentrum Borstel Logo

Experimental Pneumology, Research Center Borstel -
Leibniz-Center for Medicine and Biosciences, Borstel (DE)

 


 

 

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